New York – Apr 01 2008

April Fools' Day West Village Party @ 49 Grove

Hosted by:
Mag Goossens, Mag Goossens Consulting
Ahmet Matt Bodur, Actor/Entrepreneur
Sinem Saniye (a.ka.a Varoglu), Singer/Songwriter, www.sinem.net
Cem Duruöz, Guitarist www.duruoz.com
Pascalito, Singer/Songwriter,www.pascalito.info

SPECIAL LIVE PERFORMANCES BY SOME OF OUR HOSTS:
Turkish guitarist Cem Duruöz will play one or two pieces from his upcoming Carnegie Hall concert “Guitar in Turkey” on May 4th. Living in the US for the last 18 years, Cem has performed in four continents, released 3 CDs and is on the guitar faculty at Wesleyan University in CT.

By Sinem

NOTES:
– A raffle, for two free tickets to Cem’s May 4th concert at Carnegie Hall
– Tickets for the concert for sale (Cem has some in his possession)
– His CDs offered for sale especially the tango CD and few of his Baroque CDs just in case.
– Sinem may also sing a song or two

NO COVER from anyone, everyone is welcome. However, we would GREATLY appreciate your RSVP for staffing purposes/passed hors d’ouvres

Complimentary passed Hors D’ouvres from 7 pm to 8 pm

Entertainment by Flying Kilim Entertainment:
DJs Palamuth, Tossun and Mike Rich
Soul music, rhytm & blues and some other good dance songs

Celebrate all APRIL babies among us!

TRIBUTE TO SOUL & RHYTM and BLUES music
Soul music is a music genre that combines rhythm and blues and gospel music, originating in the United States.

Sam Cooke, Nina Simone, Jackie Wilson, and Etta James were early popular stars of the music genre, and other soul forerunners include: Mahalia Jackson, Louis Jordan, Louis Prima, and Big Joe Turner. Some of the earliest soul artists included Ray Charles, Little Richard, Fats Domino and James Brown, although all were happy to call themselves rock and roll performers at the time. During the 1960s Beatles boom, both Charles and Brown claimed that they had always really been R&B singers. Little Richard proclaimed himself the “king of rockin’ and rollin’, rhythm and blues soulin’”, because his music embodied elements of all three, and because he inspired artists in all three genres. Solomon Burke’s early recordings for Atlantic Records codified the soul style, and his early 1960s songs “Cry to Me”, “Just Out of Reach” and “Down in the Valley” are considered classics of the genre

Motown Records also contributed to the soul canon, although at the time, the Detroit-based label described itself as a manufacturer of pop music. Music by Motown artists such as Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight, and Marvin Gaye did much to popularise the style, and the overall Motown sound did much to define what later became known as northern soul. In Chicago, Curtis Mayfield created the sweet soul sound that later earned him a reputation as the Godfather of northern soul. As a member of The Impressions, Mayfield infused a call and response style of group singing that resembled the gospel style, and influenced many other groups of the era.

By 1968, the soul music movement had begun to splinter, as James Brown and Sly & the Family Stone began to evolve both soul and rhythm and blues into other forms. Guralnick argues that, “More than anything else, though, what seems to me to have brought the era of soul to a grinding, unsettling halt was the death of Martin Luther King in April of 1968.”

More versatile groups like War, the Commodores and Earth, Wind and Fire became popular around this time. During the 1970s, some slick and commercial blue-eyed soul acts like Philadelphia’s Hall & Oates and Oakland’s Tower of Power achieved mainstream success, as did a new generation of street-corner harmony or city-soul groups like The Delfonics and Howard University’s Unifics.

By the end of the 1970s, disco and funk were dominating the charts. Philly soul and most other soul genres were dominated by disco-inflected tracks. During this period, groups like The O’Jays and The Spinners continued to turn out hits.

Starting in the 1980s, soul music from the United Kingdom become popular worldwide, with artists such as Joss Stone, Soul To Soul, Loose Ends, Imagination, Mica Paris and Sade.

Famous Hoaxes on April Fools’ Day:

Smell-o-vision: In 1965, the BBC purported to conduct a trial of a new technology allowing the transmission of odor over the airwaves to all viewers. Many viewers reportedly contacted the BBC to report the trial’s success. This hoax was also conducted by the Seven Network in Australia in 2005. In 2007, the BBC website repeated an online version of the hoax.

Taco Liberty Bell: In 1996, Taco Bell took out a full-page advertisement in The New York Times announcing that they had purchased the Liberty Bell to “reduce the country’s debt” and renamed it the “Taco Liberty Bell.” When asked about the sale, White House press secretary Mike McCurry replied tongue-in-cheek that the Lincoln Memorial had also been sold and would henceforth be known as the Ford Lincoln Mercury Memorial.

Left Handed Whoppers: In 1998, Burger King ran an ad in USA Today, saying that people could get a Whopper for left-handed people whose condiments were designed to drip out of the right side. Not only did customers order the new burgers, but some specifically requested the “old”, right-handed burger.

New York – Apr 01
Tuesday, April 01, 2008 in New York at 6:30 pm

Location: 49 Grove
Address: 49 Grove Street New York NY